Write! ( of Spring )

Why Hello There!

Spring has sprung!  Spring is a time for renewal.  For everything in bloom.

In the spirit of that, why not revive your creativity and celebrate your own expression blossoming with the help of one of our classes!

Check out our offered workshops and studios to help your writing grow; to shake things up after hibernation, to work on your craft, to challenge your writing, to try something new and to meet a great community of writers like you!

Also, we had a wonderful open mic in March, thank you to everyone involved!  That night, we also debuted Frequency’s first Anthology!  Send us an email if you are interested in getting your very own copy at a suggested $5 donation.

Be on the look out for upcoming Frequency events!

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A reading with David Shields

Next week brings more events to Providence:

David Shields, fiction and non-fiction writer and champion of appropriation in literature, will be presenting a talk/reading in the Tap Room on Monday, March 4, at 7pm.  David’s new book How Literature Saved My Life, a collage/assemblage invoking several genres, was published by Knopf in February.

Monday morning

and here’s a list of links:

Mark Baumer, a writer in Providence, has written 50 novels in the past year.

&Now, “a biennial traveling festival/conference that celebrates writing as a contemporary art form”, is seeking proposals for its 2013 festival.

Have we told you about poet CAConrad’s somatic poetry exercises?

Providence Poetry Slam and the Columbus Cooperative present an evening of poetry with Buddy Wakefield and special guests from Providence Laura Brown-Lavoie (2011 Providence Grand Slam Champion) and
Eamon Mahoney. Tuesday, Feb. 26 at the Columbus! More info here (scroll down).

4,596 — the number of current fiction, non-fiction, and poetry markets listed by Duotrope, a subscription-based service that lets writers manage their submissions.

Robert Montgomery makes poems on billboards, fire, and using recycled light.

“Writing With, From, and For Others” by Maggie Nelson

As writers, we rely on others for material, filling our pages with what others have said, done, believed. In an essay, “Writing With, From, and For Others,” author Maggie Nelson thinks about self-reliance, interdependence, and how writers lean against others. Here’s how the essay begins:

For a long time, I worried there was something wrong with me as a writer, because I leaned so heavily on the thinking and writing of others. And further, that instead of wanting to hide that leaning, my impulse has often been to showcase it, to make this thinking-with-others, this weaving of mine and others’ words, part of the texture of my writing.

The flip side of this “leaning against” has been well put by Emerson, that sage of self-reliance, who famously said: “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.” This is also good advice. “Leaning against” can’t be an excuse that saves one from doing the real thinking and writing. I still struggle with this balance. I’m not saying I always get it right. What I’m saying is that it can be a worthwhile and generative place in which to experiment, stumble around, live, and create.

Read more of Nelson’s essay here.

Spring courses!

The Writer’s Notebook
This workshop is open to writers of all genres as well as visual artists (everyone!) We will indulge in notebooks by other writers as we expand our own raw scribblings. Read more.
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 9:00, April 3rd – May 22nd Location: 186 Carpenter Street, Providence
Instructor: Liz Howort
REGISTER

Open Poetry Workshop
In her Nobel speech, Wislawa Szymborska said that poets must keep repeating “I don’t know,” and that out of that confusion, dissatisfaction, and curiosity can come great poems. We’ll spend this session reading great poetry and drafting new work. Read more.
Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:00, April 12th – June 14th Location: 50 Orchard Avenue, Providence
Instructor: Darcie Dennigan
REGISTER

Leave Nothing (& Everything) to Chance: A Poetry Revision Workshop
Revising poems is as creatively demanding and consuming as writing a first draft. In this four-week revision intensive course, we’ll look at the sometimes drastically altered drafts of famous poems and try out a multitude of revision experiments. Read more.
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:00, May 9, 16, 23, 30. Location: Providence
Instructor: Darcie Dennigan
Register