Writer’s Block

It has happened to all of us at one point or another. We have a project due tomorrow, but no matter how many times we sit down at the keyboard, the words just won’t come out. Or, alternatively, inspiration comes and you write feverishly for a half-hour only to come to a screeching halt when you hit a blank wall. Writer’s block is an affliction that has plagued every writer at some point, and everyone has their own special fix to get around it. Have a strategy that helps you in the worst of times? Leave a comment below and let’s get the conversation started!

writers-block

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Head to This Tonight

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A Talk by Poet/Visual Artist Jen Bervin

When:Tuesday, April 7, 2015 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Where:McCormack Family Theater
70 Brown Street Providence

Poet and visual artist Jen Bervin, well known for her work that blends language, writing, and the visual art, co-editor of “Emily Dickinson: The Gorgeous Nothings,” will present a hybrid talk/reading on the intersection of art and writing as part of the Contemporary Writers Reading Series.Cost:freeContact:Literary Arts Program
401-863-3260  Link:www.brown.edu/cw

Writing Exercise

The Card Original Designs Inspired by Fornasetti by TheMadPlatters

The Card Original Designs Inspired by Fornasetti by TheMadPlatters

1) Think back to a person who helped you — that you were never able to thank.

2) In your story or pome, cast that person as the villain (omitting backstory or explanation for their “negative” actions).

3) Recall a person who harmed you, and never received their just punishment.

4) Cast that person as the hero or sympathetic protagonist.

5) Here’s the hard part. We know change, or the potential for change, must occur for there to be a sense of movement, purpose or meaning in our writing. Throughout your short piece, give these two characters the chance for change, but conclude with each remaining essentially positive or negative. Can you do it?

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Estimating Happiness

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It’s not news that humans are flawed when predicating what that will make our future-selves happy. Evolution hasn’t caught up yet. We still (in action) opt for the instant gratification, over-valuing the now, and fixate (in thought) on the future/past, undervaluing the current moment. Writing exercises our ability to predict the future and process the present. What writer, on their deathbed, thought “I wish I’d written less?” Yes, writing is hard, it dredges up the muck of self-deception and suppression. But unearthing our personal filth creates depth. Write. Your future self will thank you.